Simulation and Prediction for Adaptive Licensing Decision-Making

Posted by Esha Senchaudhuri

Jan 13, 2015 3:03:54 PM

Janus was the Roman God of transitions, a deity with two faces, one looking towards the past and the other the future. It was only a matter of time therefore, that clinical trial simulators, and other purveyors of predictive analytics would adopt him as an embodiment of their core initiatives. The aptly named Janus Initiative aims to model decision pathways in clinical development, using powerful simulations to help inform multiple stakeholders on adaptive licensing decisions. The objective is to give every stakeholder in the process a sense of what consequences his or her decision-making will have on other stakeholders involved.

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Topics: Prediction, Clinical Development Strategy, Software Simulations, Adaptive Licensing


Our Readers Choice: Top 10 Posts from 2014

Posted by Esha Senchaudhuri

Jan 8, 2015 5:24:25 PM

Happy 2015!

We look forward to bringing you more stories and discussion on statistical methods and clinical development in the year ahead. In case you missed any of our popular stories from 2014, here are the posts that generated the most buzz in the preceding year. 

Number 10:

Adaptive Clinical Trials: Your Questions Answered

In this interview style blog post, we we got a roundtable of our consultants together to help a customer who was curious but anxious about adaptive designs.

Number 9:

Cytel's ClipLab: Training the Next Generation of Clinical Programmers

The Cytel ClipLab is one of Cytel's educational initiatives. As the pharmaceutical industry changes, new questions arise about educating the next generation of researchers, clinicians and programmers. This post looks at the ClipLab approach to preparing recent graduates for successful careers in the industry. 

Number 8:

Data Management and Biostatistics III: Statistical Innovation and Clinical Data Management

This post was the last in a three part series on data management and biostatistics. It looked specifically at the idea of statistical innovation in the field of data management, such as that currently used in risk-based monitoring. 

Number 7:

Cultivating Versatility in Statistical Consultants

All consulting requires versatile consultants who can bring insight and innovation to a variety of challenges in strategic development. Yet the nature of the pharmaceutical industry is that it requires participants to be specialists, which in turn takes time and practice and leaves little room to develop versatility. This post examines how statistical consultants can still cultivate versatility without compromising the quality and rigour expected of specialists. 

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Clinical Drug Development: Predictions & Trends for 2015

Posted by Cytel

Jan 6, 2015 4:00:00 PM

As we head into the new year, the life-sciences industry can look forward to some long awaited advances in pharmaceutical drug development. Here are our predictions for top trends to look out for in 2015.

1: The Arrival of Adaptive Financing:

Adaptive financing was an idea that was cultivated and nurtured by members and affiliates of Cytel. It is the idea that a financial strategy can be built around outcomes that are observed at certain decision points during clinical development (for example, at interim analyses.) Constructing designs with adaptive financing in mind helps provide potential investors and study sponsors with a monetary ballpark of how much innovation will cost, and how much they have the potential to save. This helps overcome one of the biggest bottlenecks in implementing safer and more efficient adaptive trials, namely the perception by many in the industry that these trials are risky.

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Topics: Entrepreneurship, Adaptive Clinical Trials


Early Phase Development Strategy: Bayesian Methods for Go/No-Go Rules

Posted by Esha Senchaudhuri

Dec 18, 2014 3:40:00 PM

Earlier this week, we at Cytel enjoyed a riveting in-house discussion on the uses of Bayesian decision rules for Go/No-Go (GNG) decision-making. GNG rules establish the trajectory of a particular clinical program’s development by assessing whether or not a trial has met particular objects (e.g. target regions for PK, PD and safety endpoints.)

Traditionally, statisticians have used p-values and confidence intervals to construct GNG rules. However, moving to the Bayesian paradigm opens up exciting new possibilities for clinical development strategy. Our discussion earlier this week centered around three key benefits of using Bayesian statistics for GNG decision-making:

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Topics: Early Phase Trials, Clinical Development Strategy, Adaptive Clinical Trials


Cultivating Versatility in Statistical Consultants

Posted by Esha Senchaudhuri

Dec 16, 2014 4:56:00 PM

Richard Branson once wrote: “I have always valued capability over expertise. While you may need to hire specialists for some positions, take a close look at people who have thrived in different industries and jobs – they are usually more versatile, have transferable skills, and can potentially tackle problems creatively.”

He goes on to write: “Obviously a healthy mix of experience and novel thinking is the ideal, but on balance I would anticipate more fresh and objective solutions to flow from the smart and curious inexpert outsider than the ‘been there done that’ experts.”

Although the versatility to which Branson alludes is instrumental for successful statistical consulting, it is also obvious that an inexpert outsider would not be able to waltz into the drug development industry and make successful contributions. The expertise that is required is simply too much for a non-specialist. This raises an important question:

How should we, as an industry, walk this fine line between specialized expertise and versatile capabilities? 

Consider, for example, the list of seven questions provided below. 

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Topics: Nitin Patel, Cytel Consulting, Entrepreneurship, Clinical Development Strategy, Richard Branson


Adaptive Designs for Infectious Diseases Clinical Development Strategy

Posted by Esha Senchaudhuri

Dec 11, 2014 1:14:00 PM

 

A common framework for the clinical development of vaccines involves the study of several candidate compounds in Phase 1 followed by the selection of potential vaccine regimens for study in Phase 2 and Phase 3. In the attached presentation, Cytel Consulting’s Jim Bolognese compares traditional and adaptive Phase 1/Phase 2 studies for vaccines and infectious diseases, providing simulations results for both 2-stage and multi-stage adaptive designs. Jim also outlines a structure for a Hybrid Adaptive Study.

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Topics: Infectious Diseases, Clinical Development Strategy, Adaptive Clinical Trials


Drug Supply Planning for Dose-Ranging Adaptive Trials

Posted by Esha Senchaudhuri

Dec 9, 2014 12:17:28 PM

When planning a conventional trial, one can anticipate the drug supply necessary for the trial by determining how the number of patients reflected in the sample size will distribute across the trial sites. Implementing an adaptive trial, by contrast, raises many challenges for predicting the necessary drug supply. It can require planning for different sample sizes depending on the outcome of an interim look; or preparing different dosages if certain arms of a multi-arm trial are to drop after the interim look. In the case of a biomarker-driven adaptive design, determining adequate drug supply may require the ability to predict which doses are necessary for different subpopulations at particular trial sites.

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Topics: Nitin Patel, Access to Slides PDF, Bayesian Methods, Interim Analyses, optimization, Dose-Finding, Adaptive Clinical Trials


Operationally Seamless & Inferentially Seamless Adaptive Designs

Posted by Esha Senchaudhuri

Dec 4, 2014 11:30:00 AM

Fulyzaq® from Napo/Salix was the first drug ever to be approved using an adaptive two-stage "seamless" clinical trial design. However, when Napo Pharmaceuticals sought orphan drug status for Crofelemer (made from the croton lechleri plant, pictured above left), it received a short window from the FDA in which to complete a Phase 3 trial for safety and efficacy. Aiming to diminish both time and cost, Napo submitted an adaptive design for a Crofelemer trial to the FDA. Initially, the design was rejected on grounds that it would not demonstrate strong control of the type-1 error rate.

Napo then approached Cytel consultants which advised it to consider a seamless adaptive trial. A seamless adaptive trial combines 2 phases of a study into one trial, thereby allowing a trial to complete within a short window. Using appropriate techniques, it is possible to conduct such studies while maintaining strong control of type-1 error.  

A seamless adaptive design may be operationally seamless or inferentially seamless. An operationally seamless design is one in which a confirmatory trial proceeds after an exploratory one, but the data from the two are kept distinct. By contrast, an inferentially seamless trial combines data from both phases to make the final inference. Due to these two varieties of seamless adaptive designs, Napo/Salix had the following 3 trial designs from which to choose:

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Topics: Sample Size, Trial Design, Safety, type 1 error, Dose-Finding


How to Incorporate New Technology into Your Clinical Development Strategy

Posted by Cytel

Dec 2, 2014 11:00:00 AM

During a recent DIA webinar on reinventing the clinical trial, Laurie Halloran (President of the Halloran Consulting Group) and Irving Dark (Senior Vice President at Cytel) weighed in on a wide array of recent technological breakthroughs that life sciences companies can leverage to simplify clinical development. Their discussion ranged from simple techniques to cut down the 80,000 sheets of paper used for the average clinical trial (“Take it to the Cloud!”) to remote centralized monitoring techniques that make use of cutting edge statistical innovations.

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Topics: Data Management, Clinical Research Services, Entrepreneurship


A Bayesian Industry Approach to Phase I Combination Trials in Oncology

Posted by Esha Senchaudhuri

Nov 18, 2014 4:32:00 PM

Statisticians and scientists at Novartis have been at the forefront of developing a new method in early phase oncology trials called the BLRM. Many believe that the BLRM, (short for the Bayesian Logistic Regression Method,) allows for the construction of clinical trials that have the dual benefit of improving treatment for patients participating in the trials, and allowing the trial to complete in a more timely and efficient manner. 

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Topics: Dose-Escalation, Bayesian Methods, Phase 1, Early Phase Trials


Remembering Marvin Zelen

Posted by Cyrus Mehta

Nov 17, 2014 3:57:00 PM

Outstanding Thought Leader, Scientist and Humanitarian, Passes away at Age 87

It is with immense sadness that we announce that Marvin Zelen, one of the foremost statisticians of our time, widely regarded as the Father of Clinical Trials, and mentor to hundreds of younger colleagues passed away on November 15, 2014. Professor Zelen was the former Chairman of the Department of Biostatistics at Harvard School of Public Health and built it up into one of the best departments in the world by his leadership, personality and ability to attract first-rate scientists. Almost everyone who had the good fortune to work with Marvin went on to achieve fame and success. But beyond his intellectual prowess, Marvin was a wonderful human being. He was gracious to younger colleagues and went out of his way to help them in every way possible.

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Topics: Marvin Zelen


Ranking Adaptive Dose-Finding Designs using Clinical Utility Functions

Posted by Esha Senchaudhuri

Nov 12, 2014 4:04:25 PM

Clinical utility functions provide Phase 2 trial sponsors with an intuitive metric by which to measure the quality of a selected dose. Such functions reveal the efficacy-to-tolerability ratio of doses under consideration, thereby enabling trials to move forward with doses that are highly effective and which have minimal side-effects. While this is arguably the most popular use of clinical utility functions, they can also help trial designers determine which design ought to be chosen for dose-finding studies. A design which consistently chooses doses with high clinical utility should instill greater confidence than those which often miss this critical target. 

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Topics: Dose-Finding, Adaptive Clinical Trials


Translational Statistics: How to Move Beyond the Comfort Zone

Posted by Esha Senchaudhuri

Nov 6, 2014 11:09:00 AM

Professor LJ Wei holds that rules are for lawyers, not (necessarily) clinicians. When designing modern clinical trials, the impetus is often to use “efficient and reliable procedures, to obtain clinically interpretable results with respect to risk-benefit analysis…” Yet these efficient and reliable procedures are often just conventions and rules that provide information that is incomplete or difficult to make clinically interpretable.

In a presentation to the East User Group Meeting, Professor Wei identifies 11 problematic areas that currently challenge trial designers. After giving an overview of the challenges that arise in each, Professor Wei provides a few simple solutions about how to overcome them. All the solutions, however, require moving beyond the comfort zone of conventional procedures.

In the slides attached Wei discusses:

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Topics: East, East 6.3, Access to Slides PDF, Trial Design, Trial Monitoring, Training and Education, Predictive Enrichment, Precision Medicine, Translational Statistics, Translational Medicine


New Exploratory Trial Method Translates into Better Financial Strategy

Posted by Esha Senchaudhuri

Nov 4, 2014 8:30:00 AM

A key stage of exploratory drug development is implementing a proof-of-concept study to demonstrate the safety of a drug. Given the importance of accurate dose-finding for Phase 3 success, methodological improvements to proof-of-concept studies in Phase 2 can translate into greater likelihood of getting a drug to market. 

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Topics: Oncology, Access to Slides PDF, Enrichment, Safety, Precision Medicine, Entrepreneurship, R&D, Adaptive Clinical Trials


Michael Proschan on 'Blinded Adaptations, Permutations and t-tests' (Link to Slides)

Posted by Cytel

Oct 30, 2014 10:28:00 AM

 During last week’s East Users Group Meeting, Michael Proschan of the NIH and NIAID, gave a presentation on ‘Blinded Adaptations, Permutations and t-tests.’ Given the close connection between adaptive t-tests and adaptive permutation tests, Proschan argued that it is possible to determine the validity of an adaptive t-test from the validity of an adaptive permutation test. Proschan concludes that in adaptive settings, “permutation tests are often valid in adaptive settings, even if blind is maintained.”

Michael's slides are available below. You can also find two of his recent papers on blinded adaptations in the 'Related Items of Interest' section.  

View Slides

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Topics: permutations, Blind and Unblind Trials, t-tests, Adaptive Clinical Trials


Adaptive Dose Finding Using Toxicity Probability Intervals

Posted by Esha Senchaudhuri

Oct 28, 2014 9:30:00 AM

Phase 1 oncology trials typically use either rule-based methods or model-based methods to determine the most acceptable level of dose toxicity with which to move forward in Phase 2. This level of toxicity, called the maximum tolerated dose (or the MTD), is the dose which best balances the medical benefits of a higher dose with the risk of toxicity which comes from subjecting a patient to that same dose. Both rule-based methods and model-based methods determine the MTD by relying on small cohorts of patients who test a set of doses against their dose limiting toxicity.

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Topics: Oncology, East 6.3, Access to Slides PDF, East ESCALATE, Adaptive Clinical Trials


Clinical Impact Beyond 'Time to First' Analyses

Posted by Esha Senchaudhuri

Oct 21, 2014 9:00:00 AM

Every year, the East Users Group Meeting brings together notable experts from industry and academia to discuss the future of biostatistical advances in clinical trials, as well as the role of software in facilitating these breakthroughs. In honor of this year’s event, which will be taking place at the Loews Hotel in Philadelphia on October 22, the Cytel Blog will spend the next couple of weeks providing glimpses into the range of discussion presented at the EUGM table.

One debate that has already received quite some attention, involves the weighting of various morbidities in studies with composite endpoints. In a 2013 editorial in the European Heart Journal of the European Society of Cardiology, EUGM speaker Professor L.J. Wei and his colleagues wrote, "A reported P-value must not be confused with an assessment of the magnitude of a treatment's effect in a way that is meaningful to the patient, the clinician and the regulator." [1]

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Topics: East, East 6.3, Statistical Programming, Statistical Puzzles, Statistical Analysis, Cardiovascular


7 Reasons to Add a Statistical Consultant to Your Team

Posted by Cytel Consulting

Oct 14, 2014 11:05:00 AM

We are often asked how statistical consultants can add value to the clinical development process. What do they contribute to a winning strategy, and how do they optimize business decisions? 

Statistical consultants often have decades of experience in multiple aspects of clinical development, including trial design, portfolio optimization, and regulation. Having a broad and yet nuanced feel for the industry enables statistical consultants to generate novel solutions to an array of challenges faced while navigating clinical development.

If you are thinking of hiring a statistical consultant to your team, you should be aware of the many roles that they can play. Here are some of our consultants' favorite recent projects. 

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Topics: Data Management, Cytel Strategic Consulting, Cytel Consulting


You Own This!

Posted by Laurie Halloran (Guest Blogger)

Oct 7, 2014 2:00:00 PM

Guest blogger Laurie Halloran is the President and CEO of Halloran Consulting Group, a management consulting firm for the life-sciences industry. Here she offers her take on the importance of accountability, obligation and 'ownership' in consulting for pharmaceuticals and medical device companies.

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Topics: Clinical Research Services, Cytel Consulting, outsourcing


Bayesian-Bandit Adaptive Designs for Rare Disease Drug Development

Posted by Dr. Sofia Villar (Guest Blogger)

Oct 2, 2014 8:30:00 AM

Sofia S. Villar is a member of the DART (Design and Analysis of Randomised Trials) group at the MRC Biostatistics Unit in Cambridge England. She has recently been awarded the first Biometrika post-doctoral research fellowship. 

In the post below Villar offers her position on how challenges in rare disease drug development may be alleviated by Bayesian-Bandit adaptive designs. The "Multi-armed Bandit" is an agent who tries to acquire new knowledge while trying to capitalize on existing knowledge. Clinical studies can therefore utilize bandit designs to recruit patients whose primary goal in participating in a trial is to improve their health outcomes.

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Topics: Bayesian Methods, Trial Design, Rare Disease


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